About this coffee

TASTING NOTES: BLUEBERRY, POMEGRANATE DARK CHOCOLATE WINEY RIPE FRUIT SMOOTH DELICIOUS BODY LONG FINISH.

Description:

In Ethiopia’s Oromia region, Guji is a southern zone, snug up against Sidamo and Yirgacheffe, which are across the border in the SNNPR (the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples’ Region).
 
This coffee comes via Sibu Coffee, a family-owned business that was established in 2014, though the family has more than 20 years of experience in coffee, working in domestic supply to the central auction. Kedir Hassen, Sibu’s current general manager, used to collect coffee from farmers in the central markets and deliver them to the coffee auction.
Today, Sibu owns three washing stations—two in Karcha Guracho and one in the village of Hambala Damedabaye—and works directly with farmers on a number of agricultural practices. Focused on improving cup quality and crop sustainability, these practices include seed selection, planting specifics and harvest and post-harvest management. They also provide nursery and farm support.
 
Sibu Coffee both owns its own farm and works with approximately 3,000 farmers in the area; 300 farmers contributed to this coffee.
Guji Coffee is shade grown in soil that’s rich in nutrients; leaves from the shade trees fall and become compost, and coffee pulp is returned to the farmers to be turned into compost.
While the coffee is not certified organic, no chemical fertilizers are applied to the Guji coffee, making it what Sibu calls “organic by default.”

SOME HISTORY ON ETHIOPIA

Ethiopia earned 866 million USD exporting 221,000 tons of coffee during its last fiscal year .

According to Ethiopian Coffee & Tea Development and Marketing Authority, it has accomplished 92 per cent of its set goal to increase coffee exports. ” It is a very great achievement compared to nation’s previous years’ coffee export performance .”

Comparing to the coffee export volumes of 2015/16, there had been 11.5 Per cent growth in the coffee exports during the just concluded fiscal year 2016-17. Plus ,the foreign earning from coffee has raised by 20 percent due to the global coffee price hikes .

In a recent exclusive interview with The Ethiopian Herald, Market Development and Promotion Directorate Director Dassa Daniso said: ” Ethiopian Coffee has been imported to over 60 countries. But, this year, 57 countries have imported our coffee, particularly, 86 per cent ofthe total coffee exports destined for Germany, Saudi Arabia, Japan, USA, Belgium, Sudan, South Korea, among others.”

Coffee all started in Ethiopia in the 9th Century when the goat-herder Kaldi, noticed his goats acting more spritely after consuming cherries from a certain plant. Kaldi tried the cherries and noticed some of the familiar effects that we all feel when we enjoy some of the good drink in the morning. While this is a popular account of the ‘Discovery’ of coffee, there are other accounts of traders chewing cherries on trade routes from Ethiopia in order to increase energy. Ethiopia’s history is full of dramatic changes. Over the last four decades, the Ethiopian people have lived under three different forms of government, which include a semi-feudal imperial, a military rule with Marxist ideological orientation from 1974-1991, and a federal governance system from 1991 until the present. All of these periods have been accompanied by dissatisfaction, armed resistance and rebellions. Ethiopia has also confronted economic, social and environmental problems including a war with Eritrea from 1998-2000. This recent dispute with Eritrea as well other historical conflicts has provoked many damages, including lost lives, limited access to the land, emotional trauma, and extreme hunger.

Coffee still grows wild in Ethiopia’s mountain forests. Ethiopian farmers cultivate coffee in four different systems, which include forest coffee, semi-forest coffee, garden coffee and plantation coffee. About 98% of the coffee in Ethiopia is produced by peasants on small farms and it is the country’s most important export. Ethiopia is Africa’s third largest coffee producer. There are about 700,000 coffee smallholders in Ethiopia, of which 54 percent are in semi forest areas. Coffee has been part of their indigenous cultural traditions for more than 10 generations.

 

FACT SHEET

Country: ETHIOPIAN SIBU - GUJI
Farmer: VARIOUS SMALL HOLDERS
Processing: NATURAL PROCESS
Altitude: 2100 MASL
Cupping Score: 89

*Note: This are is currently in devolpement and all products will be populated shortly.

Additional Information
Coffee Size

1kg, 250g

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